What A Venture Capitalist Can Teach You About The Stock Market

Fred Wilson is a venture capitalist.

And despite his decidedly generic name, he is far from a generic VC.  Perhaps “premiere VC of his generation” is a more apt description.

Through his firm, Union Square Ventures, Wilson has been an early stage investor in a wide range of companies, including Zynga, Tumblr, Foursquare, Coinbase, Lending Club, Kickstarter, Etsy, and a little thing called Twitter.

Recently he gave a presentation at LeWeb tech conference in Paris, where the moderator asked if he was interested in making investments in more extreme type ventures, a la Elon Musk.  He answered as follows;

Fred Wilson: The kinds of things that Elon does, the electric planes, and the Hyperloop, and the SpaceX, and the Tesla; those aren’t things that that interest me, and those aren’t things that interest our firm.  They are great things, and I wish that more people would do those things….

Moderator: Why not? Too far away?

Fred Wilson: (shaking his head) We don’t have a view, we don’t think we have a unique view – - and point of view – - about those things.  And you know, the venture capital business is very competitive, like the business of entrepreneurship is a very competitive business, and the only way you win is by knowing what you are good at and what you are not good at, and sticking to what you are good at.  That is my feeling anyway.

For market participants there is a very important lesson in that last statement.

Successful VC’s live or die on their deal flow.  Because they only want to invest in the deals with the best opportunity for a successful exit, and because those deals are few and far between, they need to sort through a lot of opportunities in order to find the winners.

Wilson probably sees more deals than any other VC out there, but by his own admission, he only invests in one, or maybe two, each year, and only in areas he has a unique view.  That unique view gives him an edge over his competition and has no doubt contributed to his record of success.

Let me put that through the “VC to investor” translator.

Deal flow in the world of investing emanates from different equity classes, sectors, and instruments.   Every day that flow – - those opportunities – - present themselves in each of these areas, and your job is to sift through them, casting aside those that don’t offer a favorable risk/reward, choosing to act on only those with the best chance of success AND that are in your area of expertise.

That Wilson, with all his success, only stays in areas he knows he is good at, is a lesson in patience, focus, and not letting ego into the mix.  And understanding how his statement “knowing what you are good at and what you are not good at, and sticking to what you are good at,” relates to the markets is the key to your success.

 My Talk At LeWeb Yesterday (A VC)

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

The Most Successful Investor Of The 90′s Says There Is No Market Bubble

Dan Zanger did the unbelievable.

He turned 18K into $42 million, in under two years, during the height of the 90′s bubble market.  He doesn’t think this market is like that one….yet.

“There is certainly some frothy behavior, with many stocks overpriced, while others are priced to perfection, ” says Zanger. “However, this market is far from the ‘bubble’ behavior that we saw in 1998-2000.”

Zanger knows what he’s talking about, having cut his teeth in the markets, with various degrees of success, in the early ’90s. But it wasn’t until he became a student of William O’Neil’s CAN SLIM method, which looks for stocks with strong fundamentals and technically significant chart patterns, that he catapulted to the rarefied heights of the investing world.

Beginning in June of 1998, Zanger spent 18 months turning $10,775 into $18 million — an unofficial world record for stock market investing — which translates into a mind-blowing 164,000 percent return (and yes, he has the tax returns to prove it).  Just five months later, as the bubble was getting ready to burst, that same account had grown to a massive $42 million dollars, a feat that Trader Monthly ranked among its 20 Greatest Trades of All Time.

Click the link below to read the rest of the story.

Is the Stock Market Really About to Pop?  Why One “Bubble” Legend Says No! (DailyFinance)

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Intro To Trading Webinar For All StockTwits Members

As a “Thank You” to all of you who recently followed me on StockTwits, I am hosting an open Q&A this Friday, the 3rd, at 9:00am PST.  Anyone can attend but the real target audience is those of you who are new to StockTwits and new to the markets.  During this webinar I will answer any and all questions, to the best of my ability, about trading.  In addition, everyone who attends will get a free copy of my book Trading: The Best of The Best – Top Trading Tips For Our Times, which contains over 200 market tips from over 60 active traders and investors.

And here are the most important things to remember for this webinar; there are NO dumb questions, there are NO questions too basic to ask, and NOBODY should be too intimidated to participate.  So just sign up with the link below, and I will see you then.

*Note: The webinar is limited to 100 people so please only sign up if you plan to attend*

Click here to sign up for this free webinar.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

You Can Lead The Investing Public To The Market, But…….

Last week I kicked off a new writing gig over at AOL’s DailyFinance.  It will be different from what I do here on the blog in the sense that I’ll be writing less about trading and more about the markets, personal finance, and business in general.  I’m very grateful to have to chance to write for a broader audience, but already I have been reminded about how the individual investor can be their own worst enemy.

Case in point; a reader by the name of “Valerie,” who decided to comment on my piece “How to Improve Your Market Returns in 2014″.

The piece is about how a good market service can analyze thousands of stocks and distill them down to a manageable list of candidates for you to consider.  I asserted that subscribing to such a service was an efficient and cost-effective way to use  technology to your investing benefit.  I went to great pains not to suggest any specific services, nor to paint them as a panacea for investors, but just one of the tools they could add to their arsenal.  I also warned that there are scammers in this field and that you should always go with a service that offers a free trial first to make sure they are legit and that they fit your investing style.

So here is how Valerie weighed in on the subject (emphasis is mine):

Individual investors should be very VERY wary of anyone who claims to be able to “predict market moves”. The best minds in the investment field (who manage multi-billion dollar funds) can’t do this, consistently, and neither can these so-called “services” claiming to be able to pick the next big stock winners.

One aspect that the writer of this article conveniently glosses over is that paying 99 bucks a month for this questionable “advice” is almost 1200 dollars a year, PLUS the cost of trading stocks added to that. It’s hard to generate profits, if you are shelling out that much money for expenses. Potential taxes on all that trading should also be an important consideration, and that isn’t even mentioned in the article.

And what is going on with the writer’s belief that an internet chat room is the best place to get investment advice?? It isn’t. “Interacting with other traders” in chat rooms isn’t a good way to improve your investment returns. They will brag, endlessly, about their few big winners, but they will NEVER tell you about their many big losers.

The best advice?? If someone wants you to pay for their “stock picking service”, get a firm hold on your wallet and run. (Want to double your money quickly?? Fold it over and tuck it back in your wallet. LOL)

If you absolutely can’t resist the lure and excitement of stock trading, set aside just 10% of your investment funds for this as “fun money”. For the other 90% of your portfolio, stick with the proven long-term stock winners. Those “dull and boring” blue chips aren’t exciting to brag about to your friends, but their dividends and appreciating stock prices will make you rich over a period of time.

After reading this, I made a rookie mistake and decided to get into a good ole’ fashioned “flame war,” something I haven’t done since the Money Talk BB’s on Prodigy back in the early 90′s:

Hi Valerie,

The only problem with your argument is that you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

Nothing you say has anything to do with the ideas in the article. It is not about “predicting market moves” or a “stock picking service,” it is about streamlining the process of finding good stock candidates for a fee.

How much is your time worth? Is it worth $0.68 per hour? Because if you are paying $99.00/mo for a service where they spend 40+ hours a week watching and analyzing the market, then that is what it costs. And for that minimal fee, you get the 8,000+ stocks in the market boiled down to a list of 5-10 that you can consider. That to me is the most efficient use of money vs. time that I can think of for an investor.

And I even went as far to indicate that “yes” there can be some shady operators out there, but that most legitimate ones offer a free trial.

So, you could try a service for free, see if it works for you, and if they know what they are doing, and if so, subscribe to them for pennies a day to make your life easier….

OR…..

You could just dismiss the idea completely.

You made your choice.

Thanks for reading.

-B

Valerie then came back with a seven paragraph, five-hundred word retort, which I will not be so cruel as to burden you with here, but suffice to say, I quickly remembered why you don’t get into arguments with anonymous people on the internet — because they actually have the time to write seven paragraph, five-hundred word retorts.

Still, I can’t say that I wasn’t frustrated.  I felt like I was trying to introduce punk rock in the 70′s, or rap in the 80′s, to someone who felt musical perfection had already been achieved in the form of Foghat.  And no matter how much I tried to show them something different, cutting edge, and thought-provoking, they just wanted more of the same — double-live albums filled with twenty-minute guitar solos.

Interacting in the financial blogosphere and on StockTwits as much as I do, it is easy to forget that I’m living in a bubble in terms of market knowledge, and to those on the outside of the bubble my ideas and insights, no matter how normative I think they are, seem like the ramblings of a naive lunatic at best; and a financial charlatan at worst.

That makes my job over at DailyFinance more difficult, but also more challenging, which I like.

Check out my first two pieces for DF, The Man Who Saves CEO’s Billions in Taxes  &  How to Improve Your Market Returns in 2014 and let me know how I am doing.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

The New Rules Of StockTwits: 2014 Version

Way back in 1975, I remember a conversation I had with Howard Lindzon and Phil Pearlman, or H-Lindz and Psquared, as I affectionately called them at the time.  We were all sitting around, stroking our long, long locks of shiny, full hair, discussing the merits of various conditioners, when Howard first suggested the idea of ABBATwits, a community dedicated to the Scandinavian pop Gods who were tearing up the charts.

“H-Lindz,” I said.  “Pop music is too fickle.  You need to create something with lasting value.  Something that will stand the test of time.”  And that was the genesis of StockTwits.

Fast forward to (almost) 2014.  Now I may not be one of the Big Dogs like Greg Harmon (38,211 followers), Brian Shannon (with 38,039 followers), or some unnamed dick from the panhandle state with 38,026 followers, but I think I have been around long enough to throw some new rules out for 2014. So here they are.

Avatar Protocol

Look, I have covered this issue ad nauseam, most specifically in my post The 5 Worst Avatars For A Trader To Have, but for those of you who haven’t read that Keats-like post, here is the gist of it…

Load up a goddamn picture!  The generic StockTwits logo is not cool.  Nor is it dope, fly, jake, or the bees knees.  We all want to engage with you, but staying anonymous is not mysterious or deep; it’s just annoying.  Show us something about who you are as a person, or in social media terms, as a “brand.” Fill out your bio too.  Skip the “serial entrepreneur,” “market crusher,” and “student of the market” crap while you are at it.  Just be honest, tell us a bit about yourself and you will be welcomed into the fold like one of the hot Kardashians.

Cool The Angry Young Man Stance

Sometimes I marvel at the vitriol that goes back and forth between members on such globally important issues as “Is $AAPL a buy or a sell?”  You would think that they were arguing about whose diabetic child should get the last vial of insulin in a post-apocalyptic, zombie infested world.  Just chill.  Or better yet, cold-chill.  These are just stocks folks.  It’s okay to have an opinion, but not cool to treat someone with an opinion different from yours like they are Hitler.  Or Stalin.  Or Bieber.  Let’s all just try to get along shall we?

Chicken Littles

News Flash.  The S&P is not going to zero.  Gold is not your savior.  Roubini, Faber, Zero Hedge, and company are wrong.  Why don’t we say it Electric Company style….

WR……ONG………WRONG!    D…..ICKS……DICKS!  LO…..SERS……LOSERS!

Let’s say, for argument’s sake, that tomorrow space aliens come down to Earth and blast the NYSE and all world stock exchanges with their super-blaster rays, and the markets crash. After all the smoke clears, our new extraterrestrial masters will review the recent timeline and determine that the perma-bears and their ilk missed out on one of the fattest moves in market history.

So, barring any Independence Day shit happening, just give the “sky is falling” jag a rest.

Perpetual Crushers

You are crushing the markets.  You are in before every move.  You bought the bottom, shorted the top, and re-bought the bottom.

No you didn’t.  You didn’t even come close.  The Lord-God-Shiva Paul Tudor Jones himself only claims to catch 50 or 60 percent of a move at best, so cut the crap.

Let’s make a deal? Post every time you get stopped out for a loss along with every time you get a “four bagger.”  If that ratio is at least 5:1 then we will believe you.

I want something, and then something else, and them something else, for nothing

Hey, I was just thinking about something.   How much did it cost you to join StockTwits?  What?  How much? Oh, nothing…..you mean nada, zip, zilch, bubkis, the big donught?

So why the fuck do you think you are entitled to berate, challenge, quiz, query, berate again, and castigate people who are giving their time, knowledge, and expertise for free?

Play nice, and you will find that StockTwits and it’s members are the most valuable asset you will ever find regarding the markets.  But be a dick in tone or temperament, and you will quickly get shut down.

So, there you have it.  My rules for 2014.  Do they seem bitter?  Or course they do, and of course I have issues, but they are hard-won issues from years in the trenches.  I, and most of the recommended people on StockTwits will be more than happy to help you out in any way we can in the coming year. Just be cool and remember that behind the avatars are real people, who if treated with respect, will return that respect to you in spades.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Best Of The StockTwits Network 12-21-13

Give it up for the 17 best posts of the past week from The StockTwits Blog Network…..plus one from your’s truly.

Successfully navigating options expiration week starts with a plan (1nvestor)

***************   Simplicity ************** (Abnormal Returns)

If you want to get set up for a successful year, it all starts with the first month (All Star Charts)

Be nice to strangers….but make them laugh (Altucher Confidential)

Despite what you might think, the housing market never completely went under water (Avondale Asset Management)

Twitter’s CEO Dick Costolo on…..well, everything (bclund)

Technology will be a job generator, not a job killer (Crossing Wall Street)

Bats and crabs are telling Greg that the Japanese market is going much, much higher (Dragonfly Capital)

How is the recent FOMC move playing out in the currency markets? (FaithMightFX)

Any post about $GOOG and robots, that includes a Fletch clip, is okay by me (Howard Lindzon)

Ivan gives us this predictions for 2014 (Ivanhoff Capital)

Joe tells a very entertaining and educational story about short selling (Joe Fahmy)

The latest in the Kid’s fascinating quest to solve his health insurance problems (Kid Dynamite’s World)

Should Capitalism come with guarantees? (Points and Figures)

Charles tell us which car company is, uh….speeding into the New Year? (Sizemore Insights)

Faber, Roubini, and now Kristin?  Doom and gloom talk is getting blonder. (Talented Blonde)

Watch JB do the “Bob Hope” with a live walk-on for Guy Adami’s 50th.  Damn, this is why I love Josh (The Reformed Broker)

Jerry nailing the drop in Bitcoin (The Armo Trader)

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo on Innovation, Start-ups, Google, And More

The oft heard sound bite about Twitter CEO Dick Costolo is that he once was a stand-up comic.  The impression left is that he miraculously went from open mic night at Yuck Yuck’s to CEO of one of the world’s largest social media companies.  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  Costello has a degree in computer sciences, co-founded numerous tech start-ups, all with successful exits (including FeedBurner), and spent time in the trenches at Google before being named COO, and then CEO of Twitter.  And he did improvisational comedy, not stand-up comedy.  Big difference.

Last week Costolo was Chris Hardwick’s guest on the Nerdist podcast and spoke on a range of topics, including….

What he wanted to accomplish when he went to Google;

I don’t remember.  I don’t think about things that way.  The one interview question that I was always horrible at answering was the “where do you see yourself in three years?” Since college, whenever I would get that question, I would always think, “I don’t know.”  I can’t even see myself in three years.  I didn’t think that “now I was at Google I have to make sure ‘X’ happens by 2009.”  

It just so cool, such an amazing company, with so many crazy smart people there, that I was learning a ton, about everything.  About the way Google systems were built, about they way they thought about architecting systems, which I thought was really cool.  The way they thought about the twenty percent program at the time.  It was like ‘oh yeah’ that’s an interesting way of thinking about how you could go create new things.  It was awesome.  I loved working there.

What really goes on in the bowels of Google labs;

You would probably be disappointed to go into the actual lab, or lair, and discover that they are just working on a new type of winter coat.  Just a down coat, but half a gram lighter.

Running a start-up with structure;

I knew a guy who had been a CEO of a bunch of companies, he told me, “You know, once in a while people would tell me, well, I don’t want to have a management structure because the engineers and designers and product people here don’t want to be managed.”  And then he would go out into the hallway and talk to the actual engineers and designers and product people and they would say “I would love to have somebody give us a better sense of how we should be doing this and which direction we should be going. We kinda all have our oars in the water, but they are not going in the same direction.”

I prefer to build companies with more of a structure where people understand how what they’re doing fits into what everyone else is doing, and the context of all that stuff, opposed to, “those guys over there are doing something, and I’m doing another something.”

Is it always a good thing to scale up;

It’s not always a good thing to scale up.  I think that the big mistake people make is, “I have to do ‘X’ because I’m supposed to do ‘X’ and I’m supposed to do ‘X’ because that guy did ‘X’ and ya know, the people who invested in my company like the way that guy’s thing worked.  And they keep telling me, well, that guy did ‘X’ and so you should do ‘X.’”

Especially in Silicon Valley, we lionize these figures who everyone then says, well, that worked because person ‘X’ says “you should always do this, and so I’m supposed to do it that way.” Books are written about these guys, whoever it is; Steve Jobs, or Jeff Bezo’s, or Zucker, whoever.  I think you have to realize that doing what you think you’re supposed to do, instead of doing what you want to, is almost never a good idea.

Keeping innovation alive in a growing company;

That becomes a harder and harder challenge as the company gets bigger and bigger.  One of the things we talk about here as a company, all the time, is trying to make sure we encourage people to take bigger chances, and make bolder choices, and take bigger risks.  Because, I think that people, as the company gets bigger, start to think to themselves, without even asking anyone, “well I couldn’t do that.  If I did that, this might affect this other thing, and nobody would ever let me do that.”  And I try to make sure that people don’t feel that way.  I want people to always feel like they can suggest whatever crazy idea they want to suggest, and whatever crazy design idea they have–and let me worry about whether that is something we should do or not.  They shouldn’t be thinking about, or worrying about that.  I want to make sure that people can suggest whatever they want to suggest; I think you have to encourage that as the company grows, or people start to feel like, “I could never suggest that.  Dick would never go for that.”

 What his process is when an idea bombs;

We get together and look at it and say “why did we think that was going to be so great, and what’s the difference between that and where we are now?”  We try to look at what we planned to do, and what we thought was going to happen, and what actually happened.  Not in a post-mortem way, because that is a “what went wrong” way, and it’s not “what went wrong” it’s why did we think “this” was going to happen, and instead the “other” thing happened?

Human curation vs. algorithmic curation;

I continue to believe that there is a happy middle-ground in that world that we haven’t totally zeroed in on yet.  When we, we as in the “small Twitter,” we tried to really focus on human curation of the previous Olympic games as an event experience on Twitter, and we were only going to curate the best tweets from the best accounts, but it really lost the roar of the crowd that makes Twitter feel like Twitter. If just felt like a sterilized version of Twitter, and so you need some of the volume, and some of the roar of the crowd, and the “way out there,” serendipitous things that only the algorithms would find, instead of somebody just combing through all the best tweets of the Olympics.  But at the same time, it does feel like that right combination of the two, a curation tool plus an algorithm, is probably the right way to present those things to people.

People still, in many cases, can provide the best context to the right kinds of ways to expose information to the user.

Check out the full Dick Costolo interview (Nerdist Episode 450)

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Putting Context With Your Candlesticks

Here I explain why a candlestick doesn’t mean anything without context.

(Enlarge when video starts to watch in Hi-Definition)

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

How The Stock Exchange Works – Eurotrash Edition

Since our market is closed today and theirs is open, here is a Euro version of how the stock exchange works.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week.  If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits.  You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.  All proceeds go to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

The Best Of StockTwits 11-23-13

Give it up for the 18 best posts of the past week from The StockTwits Blog Network…..plus one from your’s truly.

Derald breaks down an earnings trade in $CRM (1nvestor)

In case you didn’t know, THE BEST daily linkfest in the financial space is right here (Abnormal Returns)

Everyone likes list posts, and this one will show you the 10 things you need to be a successful trader (All Star Charts)

How to know when you’ve found the bottom….OF YOUR LIFE!!! (Altucher Confidential)

Doing a postmortem on everybody’s favorite broken momo stock $TSLA (Avondale Asset Management)

When you get consensus from some of the best traders on the streams, it can be a powerful thing (bclund)

If the Fed can’t communicate clearly it can be a problem (Crossing Wall Street)

Derek shares his approach to analyzing the markets (Derek Hernquist)

This is the sector to look at if the market corrects via rotation instead of pullback (Dragonfly Capital)

Take inventory of your emotions and look at the data, which shows both a seasonal and momentum based trend (Dynamic Hedge)

The ECB is dovish and the FED is hawkish.  What do these divergences mean for the currency market? (FaithMightFX)

What can studying past actions by hedge funds tell you?  Maybe nothing (Ivanhoff Capital)

Pete is bullish on the cable.  Not the one going into your TV set, the $GBPUSD cross (Peter L. Brandt)

Fantastic spot on Tasty Trades where Jeff explains why Hyde Park Angels is a different type of…well, angel investor (Points and Figures)

Jess, oh Jess, where have you gone?  A classic post on stalking trading success (Rogue Traderette)

What the “F” is Warren Buffett up to now? (Sizemore Insights)

Should you get long wood? Lumber that is (The Reformed Broker)

Joe keeps it real.  Maybe too real for some people.  That is their fucking problem. (Upside Trader)

What is rail traffic telling us? (Value Plays)

If you want to learn more about investing, trading, and the markets, all while helping to kick pediatric cancer’s ass, check out my book, Trading: The Best Of The Best – Top Trading Tips For Our Times.  It includes over 200 market tips from 60 active traders and investors, and all proceeds go to the McKenna Claire Foundation to help support research for a cure.  Just click the banner below or go directly to Amazon by clicking here.

Updated Amazon Banner

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.