CNBC Is Dead – Here’s Why Retail Investors Won’t Miss It

To those of you who have been loyal readers of this blog over the last few years it might be apparent that I have “slacked off” a bit in 2014.  And by slacked off I mean, barely blogged at all.

At the first of the year I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to begin writing for AOL’s Daily Finance and About.com’s Stock Guide, and I am just now starting to figure out an editorial schedule that will let me handle those obligations as well as post regularly here.

In the meantime, check out my piece on the death of CNBC for the retail investor.  Here’s a slice….

CNBC was never really a useful tool for the retail investor, but now it occupies an awkward space where it’s neither fast enough to compete with social media, nor deep enough (nor accountable enough) to compete with long-form digital content, and not accessible enough to compete with online personalities.

Advances in technology have finally revealed the dirty little secret about CNBC — and financial news television in general: Their shows are window dressing for clients in the offices of institutional investors, and obsolete badges of honor for financial pundits.

And if you get a chance, take a look at an “Intro to Technical Analysis” series I just finished.

Thanks for your patience while I get my shit in order.  I hope to be back in the groove of things here on StockTwits very soon.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

2 Responses

  1. I have to (partially) disagree. I am always looking for more video and audio finance/market content. IMO there isn’t enough out there. I agree with your assessment that CNBC is neither fast enough nor deep enough, but that’s not the appeal. It provides an interactive and appealing media format for people to learn the language of and way people talk about the markets. I do agree that from an editorial/content POV it can be overwhelming/odd (strange segments, odd guests who are sometimes clearly talking their own book, 5 analysts shouting at each other).

  2. Whoa whoa whoa, you’re telling me that a network that prides itself in replaying hedge fund managers feuding. A show dedicated to lifestyles of billionaires. A consistent barrage of analysts speaking 36 credit hours above the retail investors head?

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