Best Of The StockTwits Network 12-1-12

Let’s be honest, you could pretty much throw a dart any day of the week at the StockTwits Blog Network, and end up hitting a post that is better than 99% of the other stuff out there that passes as financial blogging.  So to say these are “The Best of….” is a little disingenuous; let’s just say these are some of the posts from the last week that caught my attention and I think will interest you.

Go ahead, it’s ok to change your mind in trading 1nvestor

Luck, skill and the dangers of focusing on past performance Abnormal Returns

Corporate Insiders Are Buying, Should We? All Star Charts

Stock Market Video Analysis for Week Ending 11/30/12 Alphatrends

My First Customer Is Now Dead James Altucher

Amazon Turns to the Bond Market Crossing Wall Street

Defending the Fiscal Cliff Dragonfly Capital

Overheard: Two Views of China Dynamic Hedge

The Stocktwits ‘Sentiment’ Machine – Social Momentum & Sentiment Data (beta) Live on StockTwits Howard Lindzon

The Non-Issue With Energy Drinks Investing With Options

The Consumer Is Far from Dead Ivanhoff Capital

Why Wait Until January 1? Joe Fahmy

Facts: The Enemy of The Precious Metals Blogger Kid Dynamite’s World

Market Structure, Apple Inc & Research in Motion Phil Pearlman

A Few Thoughts on The Fiscal Cliff Points and Figures

Fiscal Cliff Is a Molehill Compared to Entitlement Underfunding The Basis Point

A Graveyard for Tacticians The Reformed Broker

Here’s What Conservatives Have Wrong About “Big” Government The Armo Trader

Salesforce Discloses It Will Not Earn a GAAP Profit Anytime Soon ValuePlays

And what you might have missed on bclund this week….

My Advice To A Failing Trader bclund

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

The 10 Regrets Of The First Part Of My Life

It was Socrates who said, “My only regret is that I have no regrets.”

No, it wasn’t really Socrates, it was me who said that.  Why do we have to reference some ancient Greek guy who has been dead for over 2000 years and probably anally raped more young boys than Jerry Sandusky just to give a saying gravitas?

Look, I really don’t like to dwell on the negative, but not unlike in trading, you learn more from the negative events than the positive ones.

So as I reach the middle of my life (I am forty-five and plan to live until at least ninety), I figure it is the right time to take inventory of the ten biggest regrets of my life in order to learn from them, and perhaps prevent others for making the same mistakes.

Whatever……

Anyway, here they are;

1.  Spending too much time in book stores in my youth looking for ANSWERS instead of INSPIRATION.

2.  Shorting $KBH going into the summer of 2005.  I had the right idea, but the wrong timing,

3.  Arguing with my father that there was no way that the cowbell part on “Born on the Bayou” by Creedence Clearwater was done live, and HAD to be an overdubed.  It turned out that I was wrong.  My father died two months later.  I was twenty years old.

4.  Spending so much time in my 20′s and 30′s pretending how much I didn’t care what people thought about me, when I really did.

5.  One of the few things in my life that has come “naturally” to me was parenting. With one exception.  My daughter was having problems getting “calendar marks” on her daily reports in Kindergarten.  Nothing we did could stop her from getting them. One night I decided I would pretend that if she got enough calendar marks she would have to go to a different school.  Here is how the conversation went….

Me:  So if you keep getting calendar marks, they may make you go to another school.

Daughter:  But where would the school be?

(At this point I thought if I “casually” said, “oh, it would probably be a school far away, where mommy and daddy would have to come and visit you” that I would get the reaction of, “oh don’t worry, I will make sure I never get anymore calendar marks.” Unfortunately, that’s not how it went.)

Daughter: But….but…..*sniff* *sniff*….then I would be…..*sniff* *tears* *lip* *sniff* *big tears*…so lonely without you *HUGE lip* *sniff* *tears*…and mommy.

At this point I had a choice.  Stay the course, and drive the point home, or fold like a fuckin’ Pick ‘n Save tent in a hurricane.  Call me Mister tent.

But I still regret making my little daughter ever think that there was a scenario where she would be without her family.

6.  After vacationing for six weeks in Australia, at the tender age of eighteen, my Aunt who lived there said I could stay as long as I wanted.  On the plane ride back I remember looking out the window thinking that I wanted to stay.  I should have stayed. I wanted to stay.  But I was too scared.  Who knows, I could have been Mr. @RogueTraderette if I had.

7.  Wasting the years I had with my grandparents.  There was so much love and knowledge that they wanted to share with  me, but I couldn’t wait to get out of the various Thanksgiving, Christmas, or Birthday celebrations to join my random friends, most of whom I am no longer in touch with anymore, at the bar.

8.  Turning down the “Blake” role, ultimately played by Alec Baldwin in “Glengarry Glen Ross.”  I had the part locked up but thought it would pigeonhole me as a “tough, pretty boy” in Hollywood going forward.

By the way, my reading of the line was, “See this watch? Do you see this watch?  It’s pretty isn’t it? I bet you wish you had one you stupid jerky guy.”

I think that version played better.

9.  Not selling my business ten years earlier than I did.  That company sucked a decade of my youth away from me, stuck doing what I hated, what I loathed, all in the guise of taking the “responsible” and “prudent” route.  Fuck responsible prudent people in the ass!

10.  Paris.  Wine bottle.  Utility knife.  Hot French doctors.  ”Le Dork.”  Read about it in “The ‘Second Mistake’ Theory.”

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Insider Trading Should Be Legalized! “What You Talking Bout Willis?”

This post originally appeared on TraderPlanet.com.

Currently SAC Capital, the hedge fund run by everybody’s favorite Market Wizard Steve Cohen, is at the center of an insider trading scandal. I won’t go into the details because they pretty much follow the pattern of every similar scandal….

Double secret information is leaked. Accused defendant allegedly trades on it. Federal prosecutors try to prove who knew what and when. The guilty parties go to jail and the story gets turned into a made for TV movie. See Ivan Boesky, Michael Milken, Martha Stewart, et al.

However, what’s really fascinating about these scandals when they arise is how a small but vocal minority come out of the woodwork and uses these events to argue for the legalization of insider trading.

In all honesty, it’s hard to take these people seriously. Their articles on the subject just seem like an excuse to create “link bait” type headlines that belong in the same category as “Should Firemen Just Let Fires Burn” and “Why Can’t Pre-teens Smoke Cigarettes.”

In that vein, CNBC recently ran this article on their site entitled;

“Roth: Insider Trading Should Be Legalized”

The author, Carol Roth, goes into a number of different reasons why she thinks that we should do away with the criminality of insider trading. But at the risk of being hyperbolic; legalizing insider trading would be the all-time worst decision in the history of mankind.

Okay, perhaps that IS a bit hyperbolic, but I have to take issue with Mrs. Roth’s stated contention.

In her article she suggests that both those who knowingly give insider info (the “tipper”), and those who trade on that info (the “tippee”), should be free from criminal prosecution; and that only the “tipper” should be subject to civil charges if they have violated any confidentiality agreements or fiduciary duties.

Look, I’m not a lawyer. I don’t even play one on TV. But this “hybrid” sort of arraignment seems like a prima-facie mess to me (Latin, pretty cool, huh)? Let’s start with the “practical” issue first

For arguments sake, let’s say that there are currently one thousand hedge funds, mutual funds, or similar entities in existence right now that would benefit from insider information. And let’s say that of those one-thousand, five percent of them are currently and actively trying to get insider info to trade off of.

The other ninety-five percent stay away from insider trading for fear of what would happen to them if they were caught, which we all know can include massive fines, loss of access to the markets for life, and most importantly, prison time.

Now let’s pretend that the laws against insider trading are eliminated in the way Mrs. Roth suggests. At exactly 12:00:01am on the day those laws are eliminated, all one thousand entities would now be actively and aggressively engaged in the business of acquiring insider info.

You have now created a market style ecosystem for insider information, with the problem being though that you have unleashed a massive demand for it, but only have a static supply. Insider info is not a product or commodity that you can ramp up in order to meet increased demand, and thus that insider information becomes exponentially more valuable than it currently is.

Those wishing to trade on that inside info could then freely “incentivize” the gatekeepers at companies, labs, ratings agencies, government organizations (think FDA), and so on, to give up that information, with no threat of recrimination.

In essence you’ll create a bidding war where the prize goes to the highest bidder, which will draw out people who normally would never think about divulging confidential info, but now might take the risk because of the outsized reward.

And since you have removed the criminal liabilities for the “tippee,” chances are there will be a price point at which many of them will give up their precious info knowing that it would now be even harder for them to get caught.

When you trade on insider info there is a physical record, the trade itself, of what you did, which gives prosecutors objective evidence to charge you with. However, when you just “give” insider info to someone who trades on it, there is usually no physical record of that act.

In fact, most “tippers” are found by starting with the “tippee” and working backwards. Since that “tippee” would no longer be a target, the evidential lifeline to most “tippers” would evaporate.

But even if you did catch them, how would the consequences play out in the real world? Sure, if a corporate executive gets busted for giving up info in return for a suitcase full of cash chances are nobody will pity him. But say some middle manager at a publically traded company gives Mega Global hedge fund a tip because they sent him and his family to Hawaii for a week.

How will that look on the evening news when the S.E.C. goes after him civilly for a $2,000 vacation while the principals at Mega Global, who made $100 million trading on that info, sit with impunity at their Swiss chalets, lighting cigars with hundred dollar bills?

This of course is where we get into the “theoretical” problem with decriminalizing insider trading.

Ever since the dot com bubble busted in 2000, retail traders have been leaving the stock market in droves; something only hastened by the carnage of 2008, flash crashes, and the rise of high-frequency and algorithmic trading.

The average trader sees the market increasingly as a “rigged” game, one in which they have little or no chance to win at. The message we should be sending with our actions is one that encourages individuals to come back in to the markets, not reinforces their belief as to why they should stay away.

And even if the benefits of legalizing insider trading technically outweighed the drawbacks (which they don’t), the message that would be sent to the individual trader would be something that starts with the sixth letter of the alphabet, and ends with the twentieth.

And it’s not “friendly emu.”

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Small Business 101: How To Bring Fortune 500 Employee Benefits To Your Small Business

These days everybody is an “entrepreneur” which is usually code for “I don’t know how to run a business.”  For over 20 years I owned a small business and experienced all its different phases from the start-up process to the exit sale, and everything in between (and I do mean everything).  

In this series I will share some of my insights so that if you are currently running a small business or thinking about starting one, you can benefit from my experiences and hopefully avoid my mistakes (and there were a lot of them).  And remember, every small businessman is an entrepreneur, but not every entrepreneur is a small businessman.

One of the key factors in determining whether your small business will be a success or not is your ability to attract and retain good, skilled employees. The pool from which to draw from is shaped somewhat like a pyramid. At the bottom is the largest amount of potential employees for your specific business.

Unfortunately, this group generally has the lowest skill sets and the worst people skills. As you go up the pyramid, the skill sets increase and the people skills get better, but the numbers of potential employees gets less.

Finally, you get to the top of the pyramid. These are the employees in your industry who have the highest skill sets, the best people skills, yet they are the fewest in numbers. Those are the employees you want to attract, hire, and retain for your company.

Obviously, offering competitive wages is one way in which to attract those employees, but another way to attract them and even more so, to retain them, is to be able to offer them a wide selection of employee benefits.

How do you do this as a small business?

The answer, a PEO, or “Professional Employer Organization.” A PEO in essence bundles together employees from hundreds, if not thousands of small businesses. They become a co-employer with you. This allows them to leverage a large pool of employees in order to offer better benefit programs than you could do with your company alone.

From a small business owner’s perspective there is no actual difference in the way your company runs or in your control over your employees.  The co-employment agreement is merely a technicality, but its benefits are great.

Now you have the ability to offer employee benefits just like IBM or Microsoft does. For example, through the PEO you can offer health care insurance at reasonable rates to your employees. You can offer 401(k) and retirement plans. You can offer your employees travel programs and discount purchase plans. When my company joined up with a PEO, one of the greatest advantages it offered us, and one that my employees loved, was the travel assistance plan.

The way it worked was, say an employee and his family wanted to take a trip back East to see friends. Through a pre-negotiated program with the PEO, the employee could purchase airline tickets for his family at a discount. Better yet, the cost of the tickets could be taken out of the employee’s paycheck over four successive pay periods at no extra cost.

Imagine the advantages for your employee. Instead of having to shell out one lump sum for the tickets, your employee can now purchase those tickets at a discount and have a reasonable amount taken out of their paycheck over time.

In addition to employee benefits, a PEO allows you, as an employer, to have an HR department at your beck and call.

They will provide up-to-date employee handbooks and manuals tailored to your company and industry, at no cost. They will keep you apprised of any changes in labor laws no matter what state your business is in. Any HR problems can be directed through them.  Employee disputes, disagreements, complaints, all handled by your off-site HR department.

A PEO will also do payroll and payroll processing. And best of all, provide you with competitive workman’s comp rates, rates better than you could achieve on your own.

Obviously, there is a fee for using PEO, usually a small percentage of your weekly payroll. However, the savings in workman’s comp rates, the benefits of having an HR department that’s up with the latest changes in the labor laws, and the ability to offer your employees a suite of benefits, that most of your competitors can’t, more than compensates for the cost.

Small Business 101: The Market Segment To Avoid At All Costs

Small Business 101: How To (Almost) Always Get The Winning Customer Bid

Small Business 101: How Well Do You Really Want To Know Your Employees?

Small Business 101: Dealing With The “How About A Price Break, I Have A Lot Of Business To Give You” Customer

Small Business 101: A Painless Way To Deal With Employee Advances (aka “Boss, Can I Ask You For A Favor?”)

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

What The Hell Is Going On With Your Trading Watchlist?

My offices recently moved to downtown Los Angeles from Century City.  I liked Century City, but come lunch time there was a serve lack of places to eat.  There were only three places within walking distance and it didn’t take more than a month from when I first got there until I was burned out on all of them.

Now I literally have over a hundred different places to choose from.

Tex-Mex.  Gourmet burgers.  New York style pizza.  Pan-Asian fusion kitchens. Trendy foodie cafes.  Gastro pubs.  Retarded vegan wraps shops.  Oh, we got em all in Downtown.

And I fucking hate it.

Yeah, I like good food and I like choice, but too much choice just makes my head spin. And the thing is, every one of these food places has like a hundred more options to sift through once you get inside the door.

Yesterday I was looking for a sandwich.  You know, a “Sand-Witch?”  Maybe you’ve heard of them?  Bread, meat, some necessary veggies, a little mayo, and *BOOM* you’re good to go.

But when I wandered into the tragically hip Mendocino Farms restaurant next to my building, here’s just a small sample of the choices I had to wade through on their menu.  It’s was a cryptographers wet dream.

Korean Short Rib Sandwich.  Singaporean Dosa Wrap.  Spicy Chipotle Turkey Meatball.  A Sandwich Study Of Heart.  Spicy Lemongrass Steak BanhMi.  Vegan Shawarma.  The Drunken Goat on Highway 128!

The “Drunken Goat”?  Seriously?  (It’s Herbs de Provence marinated Drake Family Farm’s goat cheese, French brie, cranberry chutney, green apple, Scarborough Farm’s greens on cranberry walnut bread in case your were curious.  AND you can add shaved, roasted free range chicken breast for only $1 more).

Even if I could figure out which one of these alleged sandwiches I might find appetizing, I still had to make it past the “bread choice” part of the competition.

Rustic White.  Buckwheat.  Dolce Forno Soft Roll.  Grilled Honey Wheat Tortilla Wrap. The Sensitive Baker’s Gluten-Free Bread.

Anyone ever heard of sourdough break for Christ’ sake?

At that point I just said “screw it,” and went next door to Mickey D’s for a comfortingly ubiquitous Quarter Pounder w/cheese combo.

The poster boy for obnoxious sandwiches

I have the same disdain these days for the sprawling and unwieldingly large watchlists that I often see newer traders maintain.

Let’s face it, there is a fascination among some traders to be the “Indiana Joneses” of the markets.  Finding and filling their watchlists to the brim with all sorts of exotic and unusual stocks.  Being the first to discover that Peruvian tech start-up that is going to knock $AAPL on its ass as soon as it launches it’s new biodegradable smartphones made out of coca leaves.

I get emails all the time from traders asking me what I think of this penny stock, that microcap pharmaceutical, or some random illiquid ADR they are sure is their ticket to riches.  These stocks are the equivalent of that “Drunken Goat” sandwich.  Obtuse. Hard to understand.  Purposely inaccessible and frankly unnecessary.

The question I ask them is “why do you have to find and trade the next $AAPL killer when you have $AAPL?”

Mind you, I am not saying to turn a blind eye to up and coming stocks or sectors, like the 3D space for example.  There are real companies in that sector like $DDD and $SSYS that have liquid and tradable stocks.

What I am saying is that you should always have a stable of tried and true stocks that you know and understand on your “go to” list to trade.  There are no bonus points in the market for making money off of a Bolivian mining stock instead of $GOOG.

My watch list tops out at 350 stocks max, filtered by a number of factors, two of the most important being liquidity and sector “hotness.”  My goal is to find reasons to cut stocks from that list so that I can keep it manageable and leave room for any worthy additions.

From that list I distill out 10-15 stocks each Sunday that I think may be in play for the coming week.  Normally a few will drop off the list and few might come on over the course of the week, but once again, the goal is to figure out which stocks don’t need to be on that list so that you are left with only the best candidates to trade.

I know traders who can trade almost any type of stock and have watchlists that number in the thousands, but these are people who have been in the markets for years.  Their methods for building and using watchlists have evolved with time and experience, and even then, they are the exceptions to the rule.

If you are new to trading, or having a hard time keeping an eye on everything in your watchlist, think about limiting it with some simple criteria that makes your job as a trader simpler, easier, and more profitable.  Let someone else find the next “Drunken Goat,”  because most of the time a good “ham on rye” will do the job just fine.

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

My Advice To A Failing Trader

A veteran trader recently reached out to me.  Twenty years ago he started out as a lowly floor runner, but through sheer guts and determination worked his way up to being a “local” in the pits.  After a number of years of success there, he was able to make the transition to trading from home, which he has been doing for the last ten years.

In 2008 he had it all, the house, the fancy cars, and the addition of his first-born child. Then he had a spectacular suicide trade and just like that, all the “stuff” his twenty years of successful trading had brought him was gone.

In his own words he told me that he is “still trading on an intravenous drip, but have done nothing for 4 years but run from the ghost of 2008.”

What he wanted to know from me was if I had any advice on how to exercise those “ghosts” and get back to the business of being a successful trader.  Here is an expanded version of what I told him, and it goes for anyone that is currently having a tough time in the markets.

As counter-intuitive as it might sound, I would start to get involved in helping/mentoring new traders, and here’s why….

First off, it’s a good thing to do. It makes you feel good about yourself when you are helping others. I bet you have a ton of knowledge that beginning traders would love to have access to.

The other great thing about helping mentor others to trade is it forces you to repeatedly talk about and illustrate what the most important things are for successful trading.  Chances are you may have forgotten some of those things and this process will help reinforce and re-internalize them yourself.  See my post “Stops And Smiles Should Be Automatic.”

Next, start a blog. Crazy huh? What sort of friggin’ idiot blogs about the markets, right?

But writing stuff down is cathartic. It allows you to crystallize what went wrong (or is still going wrong) with your trading, identify it, and then leave it behind.  You don’t even have to have to make your blog public, it can just be an online journal if you want.  It’s the process that matters.

Next, give yourself a break. Everybody screws up. Take some time each day to enjoy the little pleasures of life. A nice beer, good food, a cigar, a cool breeze on a beautiful day, etc.

Sounds simplistic but I can tell you from experience, when traders are having a losing streak, especially an extended losing streak, their world tends to become ONLY about the markets.  That is a great way to lose perspective and without perspective in your trading you are more apt to continue your money losing ways.

Next, if you aren’t currently doing something physical everyday, then start.  Go to the gym.  Rollerblade at the park.  Ride your bike around the block 10 times. You are starting the process of mentally getting back in “fighting shape,” make sure your body is in that same shape as well.

Finally, look at your child. He/she doesn’t care if you are a good trader or bad. Rich or poor. Cool or a nerd. Your kid just needs you to be the best dad you can be. That is THE MOST IMPORTANT job you will ever have. Get into it. Have fun with it. Trust me, it will be the best thing you ever do.

It’s hard to take a knock down like you had, but you’ve stayed in the game for this long which means that it isn’t your track record of winning that is the outlier, it’s your recent losses that are. Learn from your mistakes, don’t repeat them, and re-build.  If you do, it will get better.

Hope this helps.

What do I know about giving advice?  A lot of people have told me they have learned from things I have written on this blog, and if that is the case, then I am happy about it, but I don’t consider this a “self-improvement” blog.  There are others who do that.

I generally think that the advice we give to people is the same advice we would give ourselves.  So this is in fact what I would tell myself if I was in the same situation. Hope it helps.

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Your 13 Trade Ideas For The Week Of 11-26-12

The markets got a nice bounce last week, however due to the short holiday week and volume being less than desirable, that bounce is guilty until proven innocent.

The name of the game since this market decline started has been “relative strength,” and there are a number of charts that are showing that in spades, but first let’s take a look at some sector action.

Two weeks ago I wrote, “After being in a down channel for six months, $SKF put in a double bottom and broke out of that channel.  If it breaks resistance at around $39.50, that would not be a good thing.”

Fortunately it failed that breakout (see arrow on above chart).

The analog twin to $SKF, the $XLF made a nice bounce off it’s 200ma which hopefully means the financials have more gas in their tank.

The biotechs were hot, hot, hot this year but got taken down when the market decline started.  The $IBB however did a  ”double tap” at the 200ma and bounced nicely. Need to see some consolidation first, but that could set up another run in this sector.

Another hot sector this year as been the homebuilders.  $XHB found support last week and looks like it is poised to go higher.

About two months ago in this post I noted that the $FXI seemed to have found a bottom.  After a nice break out it pulled back to support and the 200ma and bounced well, which is good price action.

So let’s take a look at some individual stocks.

After a small head fake, $BAC has resumed its upward movement and looks like a buy above $10.00 if it can breakout with volume.

I don’t know anything about $CEL but its been basing right below gap resistance and has broken its 200ma for the first time in about two years.

Looking like it may have put in a bottom, $CMI will have resistance right at the trendline and the 200ma.  Breaking out past both those could ignite a nice more up.

The monthly chart of $CRM looks even better as it is getting near all-time highs.  A break above the trendline with volume is the buy point.

Recapturing the 200ma is a good sign for $EA.  A couple of days of sideways action below resistance would set up a nice long trade.

Will it or won’t.  Who knows, but if you want to play it long, there is a clear line in the sand here for $FB.

In the homebuilders, $LEN looks the best as it consolidates right below a five-year high.

Tough to trade at times, but $MA is a powerhouse basing just below all-time highs.

Materials & construction go hand in hand with homebuilders, so it’s not surprising that $MAS is breaking out here.

This slow, wedging action out of the flag is technically bearish, but if $NFLX can break $85.00 with any conviction a lot of short sellers are going to have to cover which could squeeze this thing higher very quickly.

A little head fake out of the flag, but price came right back in which makes the chart in $NTE still look good.

I like the action in this channel for $TEX.  A measured move out of it could take the stock to the $29.00-$30.00 area.

After coming off a bottom in July, the price range in $TIVO continues to get narrower, indicating a big move is coming.

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

On Creativity And Creation Courtesy Of The Oatmeal

If I could draw comics and was about one hundred times funnier, my blog would resemble that of The Oatmeal (aka Matthew Inman).

His latest comic is a hilarious, but painfully accurate depiction of what the process of creating web content often feels like for me.

It’s (somewhat) comforting to know that creativity can be a struggle for even the brightest minds out there.

Check out the full comic below.

Some thoughts and musings about making things for the web (via The Oatmeal)

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Best Of The StockTwits Network 11-24-12

Let’s be honest, you could pretty much throw a dart any day of the week at the StockTwits Blog Network, and end up hitting a post that is better than 99% of the other stuff out there that passes as financial blogging.  So to say these are “The Best of….” is a little disingenuous; let’s just say these are some of the posts from the last week that caught my attention and I think will interest you.

The Covered Call 1nvestor

Do We Need To Be In Japan? All Star Charts

Facebook Breaks Resistance, Time to Buy? Alpha Trends

What Should You Accomplish In Life? Altucher Confidential

Point Spreads and Efficient Markets Crossing Wall Street

Quick Breadth Snapshot Derek Hernquist

Themes I’m Wacthing Downtown Trader

Silver and Gold into Christmas Dragonfly Capital

Marketview: Precision Selloff Dynamic Hedge

China China China…Seriously…Pay Attention Howard Lindzon

EUR/USD Breakout through 1.2900 and Intraday Set Ups to Watch Raghee Horner

Nuclear Power Continues Comeback Post-Fukishima AlphaVN

Why I think the dead-cat bounce in U.S. stocks may be just about over Peter L. Brandt

Microeconomics Monday-What’s More Valuable? Water or Diamonds? Points and Figures

Next Step on The Road To Incredibleness – FOCUS Rogue Traderette

Japan is the Next Shoe to Drop Sizemore Insights

Black Friday More Likely Fifty Shades Of Grey For Retailers Talented Blonde

Three Positive Signs In a Dismal Market The Reformed Broker

The Obvious Trade The Armo Trader

And what you may have missed on bclund this week…..

You Are The Worst Trader Of All-Time If You Made Money Off This Buyout Bclund

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.

Crossfire Hurricane: Becoming The Rolling Stones

I admit that I was late to the party in becoming a fan of the Rolling Stones.  As a kid who grew up on a steady diet of punk and new wave and the Stones seemed old and irrelevant to me at the time, but fortunately I have come to appreciate their music in the last few years.

One of the interesting things I took away from the new HBO Documentary “Crossfire Hurricane”, which chronicles the “early” years of the Stones, is how much their musical direction was affected not just by the glimmer twins, Jagger and Richards, but by the guitarists that rounded out the group’s fifth slot over the years.

In fact, you could argue that there have really been three different and totally contrasting versions of the Stones; coinciding with the tenures of Brian Jones (1962-1969) the multi-instrumentalist dandy with a passion for the blues, Mick Taylor (1969-1974) the reluctant virtuoso rock star, and Ronnie Wood (1975- present) the party boy with a rough and cutting style which perfectly compliments Richards.

Another great takeaway was how oblivious the Stones have been throughout their career to the concept of age.  They didn’t think they were too young when barely in their 20′s to take up the mantle of legendary the legendary American bluesmen, nor too old when nearing their 40′s to beat back the threat of those same punk and new wave bands I idolized so much.

Even if you’re not a fan of Mick and the boys, it is a fascinating peek into the band that set that standard for what rock stars are supposed to be.

Crossfire Hurricane via HBO Documentaries

Why not subscribe to bclund.com for free  Via E-mail or Via RSS and follow me on StockTwits and Twitter?

What bclund is, is the intersection of markets, trading, and life (with some punk rock, pop culture, and off-beat humor mixed in).  Check out “The Best Of bclund” to get started.

Brilliant stuff like this rains down like..well, rain, on my stream during the week. If you want to get wet, follow me on Twitter and StockTwits. You can also pick up my book Trading – The Best of the Best: Top Trading Tips For Our Times by clicking here.